A Village in the Third Reich: How Ordinary Lives Were Transformed By the Rise of Fascism – from the author of Sunday Times bestseller Travellers in the Third Reich

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A Village in the Third Reich: How Ordinary Lives Were Transformed By the Rise of Fascism – from the author of Sunday Times bestseller Travellers in the Third Reich

A Village in the Third Reich: How Ordinary Lives Were Transformed By the Rise of Fascism – from the author of Sunday Times bestseller Travellers in the Third Reich

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Having previously written about visitors to Germany during the 1930s and their opinions about the rise of Hitler and Nazis in Travellers in the Third Reich (excellent! Boyd cleverly shows through the recollections of the residents just how a nation could support, or just accept, the Nazi regime when it is unfathomable to the rest of the world how that could happen.

Church groups were outlawed, children were put into 'educational' camps, and the notorious Dachau opened nearby. It certainly has a cast of villagers who could populate a great story: a Dutch aristocrat who smuggles Jewish children out of Germany; the daughter of one of the conspirators who plotted to assassinate Hitler; ‘good’ Nazis; members of the German resistance, to name but a few and, oh, not forgetting the man who made the largest shoe in the world! As Julia Boyd emphasizes, too many people allowed reverence for a nation’s glorious past to warp their judgment about its morally repugnant present.Her previous books include A Dance with the Dragon: T he Vanished World of Peking’s Foreign Colony, The Excellent Doctor Blackwell: The Life of the First Woman Physician and Hannah Riddell: A n Englishwoman in Japan. The killing of an arbitrary percentage of the weakest in society closely parallels the activities of Lenin and Stalin, who believed that ten percent of the Bourgeoisie needed to be killed at regular intervals to effect social change by creating vacancies which people of a different social class might fill. But among academics, social scientists, and close watchers of Russian social trends, the Levada poll showed signs of something else: a Russian reluctance -- or even fear -- of speaking frankly and honestly to pollsters. A rich and absorbing book, - maybe even a bit too overwhelming for the layman -, but as a Germanist, this book proved to be an absorbing read, and an incredible journey through the Oberstdorfarchives and eyewitness accounts of the villagers.

This is one of those books that is hard to rate because the content has such a somber air around it. Her story introduces a plethora of characters, some 60 names in total, making it difficult for a reader to follow and determine who is “important” and who is not. The authors select a few of the prominent and not so prominent residents of the village to take a deep dive into their lives. I really enjoyed getting to know the many characters and due to the unbiased narration I can draw my own conclusions.It's very informative and even though it occasionally becomes a little confusing, it's still worth a read. Evidence of such a surge, however, ​also showed up last week in a survey by one of Russia’s most reputable independent pollsters, the Levada Center.

narfna on “What the stories never said: at the end of the day, if a man wants to kill you, he kills you. Let Churchill and Chamberlain taste our German bombs,” 11-year-old Max Müller wrote in a letter to a local Luftwaffe pilot deployed during the Battle of Britain. When armed conflict began, casualties among Oberstdorf’s men were low, but they spiralled upwards when the campaign in the east began.What Julia Boyd and Angelika Patel have done is nothing short of remarkable: they’ve documented in detail how villagers, at first slowly and then rapidly, came to embrace Nazism.



  • Fruugo ID: 258392218-563234582
  • EAN: 764486781913
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